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Safe Agreement Equity

As the security of a single flexible document without many trading conditions, start-ups and investors save money in legal fees and reduce the time spent negotiating investment terms. Startups and investors generally have only one point to negotiate: the valuation cap. Since a safe does not have an expiry date or maturity date, no time or money should be spent on extending maturities, reviewing interest rates or otherwise. The start-up (or another company) and the investor enter into an agreement. They negotiate things like: Y Combinator, a well-known technology accelerator, created the SAFE rating in 2013 (simple agreement on future capital) and uses it to finance most start-ups participating in three months of development meetings. Since 2005, Y Combinator has funded more than 1,000 startups, including Dropbox, Reddit, WePay, Airbnb and Instacart. Our updated safes are post-money safes. By “post-money” we say that the safe owner is measured by post, all the safe money is accounted for – which is now his own trick – but before (before) the new money in the price cycle that transforms and dilutes the coffers (normally series A, but sometimes the Seed series). The post-money safe has what we think is a great advantage for founders and investors – the ability to calculate immediately and exactly how much property the company has been sold. For the founders, it is essential to understand how much dilution is caused by each chest they sell, just as it is fair for investors to know how much they have bought ownership of the business. At Dorm Room Fund, we invest with unlimited SAFEs at no discounts, but with an MFN clause. This means that when converted into equity, founders end up having more of the business than if there was a cap or discount.

If new investors buy shares for $1.00, it`s also Dorm Room Fund. The exact conditions of a SAFE vary. However, the basic mechanics[1] are that the investor makes available to the company a certain amount of financing at the time of signing. In return, the investor will later receive shares in the company in connection with specific contractual liquidity events. The main trigger is usually the sale of preferred shares by the company, usually as part of a future fundraising cycle.